The Great Gatsby Initial Trust Analysis

Tuesday, March 22, 2022 2:59:07 PM

The Great Gatsby Initial Trust Analysis



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A Psychoanalysis of Jay Gatsby (The Great Gatsby)

Literary study will be infused with historical applications for a better understanding of the social and historical context of the readings. Literary terms and elements of poetry will be discussed throughout this course. Vocabulary will include literary terminology as well as general terminology important for high school students to learn. Grammar instruction will be given through various writing assignments. Students will have a few novels assigned for outside class reading.

Chapters will be selected and assignments given with a deadline of the end of the week. This will help students practice meeting deadlines and it will help us move through more of the literature available to us. Each Response to Literature should be at least words in length. The entries should be graded out of Every 10 days students will have a Vocabulary Quiz matching. At the end of each quarter 45 days , there will be a test. In addition to questions about readings, literary periods, and terminology, the tests will have a vocabulary matching section. You should study your quizzes in preparation for your quarterly exams.

The final exam will not be cumulative. Reading List: In order to make this course more complete, we had to choose at least one more recent novel. Due to copyright laws and public domain access, this one book will not be available online for free, although you can search for a PDF of it online which you might be able to find. This book will need to be obtained by some method: PDF online, Kindle purchase , the local library, or used bookstore. This Mass Market Paperback version is inexpensive. Quizlet vocabulary lists. Welcome to your first day of school! I wanted to give you one important reminder before you begin. Many of your lessons below have an internet link for you to click on. When you go to the different internet pages for your lessons, please DO NOT click on anything else on that page except what the directions tell you to.

DO NOT click on any advertisements or games. DO NOT click on anything that takes you to a different website. Just stay focused on your lesson and then close that window and you should be right back here for the next lesson. Primary Menu Support Got a Question? Search Search for:. Credits: 1 Recommended: 10th, 11th, 12th Prerequisite: Literature and Composition is recommended to be used first. Please scroll up to read notes about this course! Lots of info is at the top of this page. Please see also your learning outcomes. You will have bi-weekly vocabulary quizzes throughout the course and vocabulary words will appear on your unit tests.

You will be studying terminology related to the historical context of the period we are discussing as well as literary terminology. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: narrative , archetype , myth , oral tradition An EP student made Quizlet vocabulary lists for this course. You may want to bookmark her page of lists.

This is a literature survey course. We are looking at individual authors and their works, but also at the big picture in literary movements and their historical context. Read about Native American Oral Literature. Read the The Navajo Origin Legend. What makes these myths and others like them essential to American Literature? Native American literature is rooted in oral tradition and stories were passed down. Myths discussed beliefs about the origin and nature of the physical world, social order, appropriate behavior, human nature, as well as good and evil. Oral literature was often characterized by repetition and ritual. Archetypes were common in these stories as good vs. Today you will receive a reading assignment and a related work assignment.

The reading and assignment should be completed by the end of the week. You can decide how much you want to read each day to stay on schedule. The outside reading should NOT be considered optional. You will be tested on this material within this course and it will be literature you should know about for the American Literature CLEP. The Scarlet Letter has some heavy subject matter, so parents should be aware of the specific themes discussed. It is important to be familiar with this novel when discussing significant works of American Literature. Watch the video summary. Download the study guide for The Scarlet Letter.

If you print this to work offline, please note that page numbers needed are the page numbers of the PDF itself-as shown in the toolbar, not the page numbers written on the study guide. Complete pages of your Study Guide. You should expect to be done this assignment by Day 5. When assignments tell you to discuss in your small group, instead discuss the issues with a parent or other adult in your household. Try to complete everything else. Read about Annotating and Close Reading. This is the end of your work for this course for your first day. Lesson 2 Vocabulary Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Read about John Smith. Early American writers first had to ensure their own survival before they could think about writing for entertainment.

These early writings were more about keeping historical records than of creating something with literary value, so these works would be narratives, descriptions, observations, reports, journals, and histories. We need to be mindful of this when reading them in this current day. Lesson 3 Vocabulary Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: litotes , allusion , connotation , denotation , style, Reading Read about the Puritans.

Read about William Bradford. Watch the video and read about the Mayflower Compact. Use the questions to help direct the notes you take on what Bradford writes. Bradford uses several literary devices to create his own style. The way an author uses language is his or her style. If an exam question asks you to describe the style an author uses, you should describe the rhetorical devices the author uses to create his or her style. Can you find anymore in the text? Look again at the definition of litotes from your vocabulary. Bradford uses this device in his writing.

Writing Read about 7 Critical Reading Strategies. Yes, this is related to writing! Lesson 4 Vocabulary Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: hyperbole , personification , alliteration Reading Read about Calvinism in New England Puritan Culture. Tell someone what T. Puritans believed that God had absolute sovereignty and authority. Of course these beliefs would influence the literature they produced. Read about Puritanism in American Literature. Lesson 5 Vocabulary Record these words and their definitions in your notes.

Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: diction , assonance , consonance Reading Today you should be done Chapters of The Scarlet Letter as well as pages of the study guide. Review the instructions for Response to Literature assignments in the course description at the top of this page. Record your score out of 30 on the grading sheet using the rubric. Lesson 6 Vocabulary Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: ambiguity , anachronism , anecdote Reading Read about John Winthrop.

Read about the Massachusetts Bay Colony. Use your function keys for a search for that phrase on the page. Read to the end of the page. For the future United States of America? What does this sermon explain about the beliefs and goals of the Puritans? What concrete ideas does it make you think about? What imagery would Winthrop be creating for his Puritan community and their sense of mission? Complete pages of your study guide. You should expect to be done this assignment by Day Lesson 7 Vocabulary Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: lyric , apostrophe , captivity narrative first paragraph Reading Puritan literature was usually written in a very plain style.

It was characterized by clear expression — short words, direct statements. Writing You will have a Reflective Essay due on Day Essays are to be words long. Here is the Reflective Essay Rubric you will be using to grade this essay. Review the rubric for an idea of what is expected of you and refer to it as you write your essay. A reflective essay is your chance to write about your own views of a personal encounter or experience. This type of writing is more than just your personal feelings. Writing reflective essays is an important element in academic writing. It requires analysis and personal reflection with substance to it. We will be going through lessons to help teach you how to craft a strong essay.

Everyone will write at their own pace, so you may need to revisit the writing lessons at different points in the course. That is fine. Use your time wisely to be able to complete the essay by or before! Your papers should be presented in MLA format style. Choose from the following ideas: a life-changing experience, a mistake, or a world event. Life-changing experiences can be happy or traumatic, but they can have a tremendous impact on us.

How has the experience shaped your goals and thoughts about the future? We all make mistakes, but some mistakes change us. Your outlook or the direction your life was going may have been changed by this mistake. Think about what led up to the mistake, what you could have done differently, and how that mistake changed you for better or worse. If this mistake impacted you in a negative way, what steps have you taken to change things for the better? Sometimes world events can have a huge impact on us. Was this event a good thing or a tragedy? Think about and analyze the way the event affected others and how it personally affected you. Lesson 8 Vocabulary Record these words and their definitions in your notes.

Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: rhythm , iamb , trochee , meter Reading Read about Anne Bradstreet. What do you think the speaker is describing? Women in that time were not supposed to find interest in things outside of their husbands and family life. As a writer, Anne Bradstreet was breaking all the rules. Her writing was criticized harshly because she was a female and because she spoke out against the societal roles for women. Anne Bradstreet was the first North American to have a book of poetry published.

This is significant for several reasons. Bradstreet was a woman and a Puritan. She expressed her faith, her love for her husband, and her love for her home in her writings. However, she was not always content when it came to the restrictions placed on women by her society. She used her writing to publish her thoughts on all of these things. Writing Read the article about reflective writing Take notes to help you plan your Reflective Essay. Lesson 9 Vocabulary Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: anapest , dactyl , spondee Review your vocabulary from the past two weeks for your quiz tomorrow.

Reading Read about Phillis Wheatley — What are some facts that make Phillis Wheatley an important figure in American Literature? Write them down in your notes. Read the information and summary on the same page. What reason does the poem give for her love of freedom? Writing Start to gather your ideas for your Reflective Essay. Brainstorm about your topic. Reflective writing includes description what, when, who and analysis how, why, what if. You are using your writing as an exploratory tool.

You are going to be using different aspects of writing and language for your reflective essay. You will be using descriptive methods as you are outlining your topic. You will use explanatory language as you are explaining to your reader why or how this incident happened. Finally, you will be using expressive writing and language I think, I feel, I believe. Think about writing strong sentences even as you are describing feelings. Try not to use slang colloquial language. The mechanics of your writing should be checked for errors. Always give your best effort. Grade it by using the answer key. Record your grade out of 25, not This gives you a potential for extra credit. There will be a vocabulary midterm and final that will quiz you on some of these words.

Really learn them and use them throughout the course to keep them in mind. Click on each, term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: pyrrhic , trimeter , tetrameter Reading Today you should be done Chapters of The Scarlet Letter as well as pages of the study guide. Lesson 11 Vocabulary Record these words and their definitions in your notes.

Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: pentameter , hexameter , persona , conceit Reading Read about Edward Taylor. Read about the Metaphysical poets. Taylor uses a central conceit an extended metaphor that may be stretching reality in this poem. Can you identify it? Writing As you begin to process your ideas for your reflective essay, be prepared to examine your beliefs, values, attitudes and assumptions.

Consider how and why you think the way you do about this topic. Let those hows and whys help you form what you would like to share in your paper. Use descriptive language to show that you have thought critically about the topic. You are writing about yourself, your ideas, and your opinions. Unlike other academic writing, using first person pronouns are allowed in these types of essays. Lesson 12 Vocabulary Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each, term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding o f its meaning: tone , voice , symbolism Reading Read the description of The Enlightenment and the Great Awakening.

Add these to your notes. Read about Jonathan Edwards. Consider your prior knowledge of Puritan life and belief systems. What are the prominent themes communicated by the images and analogies that Edwards uses? This sermon is illustrating the biblical concept of sin being a great grievance against God that must be punished. How does Edwards use rhetorical elements in the sermon? Read through these rhetorical devices and examples from the text. Take notes. Choose 5 questions. Record your grade out of 4 instead of 5. We receive no student work. Lesson 13 Vocabulary Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: aphorism , autobiography , blank verse Reading Read about Benjamin Franklin, the writer.

Read pages and pages of The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin. How does Franklin feel about human nature? How does he feel about education? Do you agree or disagree with his views? Which one would you say is the least important? If you were writing an autobiography, are there things about yourself that you would want to leave out? Choose 3 aphorisms from the list that you like.

Write down the meaning of each aphorism and categorize it by whether it is a moral lesson, an implied metaphor, or just a funny comment on life. Writing Read over the article Reflective Writing: a basic introduction. Take notes to help you in your essay planning. Lesson 14 Vocabulary Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each, term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: balanced sentence , rhetorical question , imagery Reading Read about Patrick Henry. How did it make you feel? What made his arguments powerful? How did he appeal to logic? How did he appeal to emotion? How does Henry use rhetorical questions in his speech? What Biblical and mythological allusions does Henry make in his speech?

How would each allusion relate to what was happening in ? You may look these up to help you answer. Read the summary of Common Sense. What emotions does Paine appeal to? List a few examples of where Paine makes appeals. Persuasive writers uses metaphors and analogies in their arguments. Paine uses an analogy connecting the King of Britain with a thief. What point is he trying to make using this analogy?

Writing Writing a reflective essay will be similar to how you would write a narrative essay. You will include elements of a narrative: plot, characters, setting, conflict. A common structure for a reflective essay is Introduction, Body, and Conclusion. Introductions do not need to be longer than one paragraph. The details should be saved for the body of the paper.

Your introduction is just a preview of what is to come in your paper. Click on each, term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: point of view , prose , colloquialism Reading Just in time for us to begin discussing the Romantic Period in American Literature, today you should be done The Scarlet Letter as well as pages of the study guide. You can find a completed study guide here to use as a reference. Take the quiz for The Scarlet Letter. Record your grade out of 24 instead of This gives you the potential for extra credit.

Lesson 16 Vocabulary Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each, term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: allegory , free verse , anaphora Reading Read about Transcendentalism. Read more about Nathaniel Hawthorne. Before you read the story, read this article in the Commending the Classics series, discussing the literary conventions and context. Writing The body of your reflective essay is where it is most like a narrative. You are recreating an event and giving specific details. Your job here is to make it clear to the reader the reasons this event is significant. Your event should be well developed.

Give background information that is relevant. Be sure your events are organized clearly. If you are using chronological order, make sure that is known. Keep a consistent point of view. It is important that you remember enough about the situation or event to be able to write about it and to maintain interest in it both for yourself and the reader. Lesson 17 Vocabulary Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: genre , character foils , novel Reading Read about The Romantic Period in Literature.

Read about William Cullen Bryant. This was his first critically acclaimed poem. What event is being described in lines ? How does the author say we should approach death lines ? Also, where previously one was secure in the belief that God was in control, Romanticism looks more to Nature as a divine force. How does this piece fit those ideas? We should find solace in being emotionally connected with others who die. Nature is the great comforter here. Nature welcomes us in death the elements of nature decorating the tomb. Read about Oliver Wendell Holmes. What is the alternative proposed in the poem for Old Ironsides? Lesson 18 Vocabulary Record these words and their definitions in your notes.

Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: satire , inversion , figure of speech Reading Read about Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. Read Stanzas on Freedom. Lesson 19 Vocabulary Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: paraphrase , conflict , dialogue Reading Read about Transcendentalism. Read from Nature Read the Introduction and Chapters Emerson writes that there are ways the woods can change a man. Man can find truth in solitude and in nature. Man has the ability to enjoy perfect exhilaration.

Man can cast off years. Man can return to reason and faith. One characteristic of Transcendentalism was the belief that individuals should trust their own instinct, insight, and intuition when making important decisions. What problems do you see with this idea? Do you think morals are dependent upon a situation and are relative to an individual? Or do you think morals are more definite than that? Is there an absolute wrong and right? Writing Look over the rubric for your Reflection Essay and compare what you have for your essay to the rubric expectations.

How well are you doing? Where could you improve? Make changes as needed. Record your grade out of 21, not Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: dialect , static character , dynamic character Writing Remember that your Reflective Essay is due on Day As part of your essay writing, when you turn in your essay, include a self-evaluation addressing the following questions: Did you stick with your original topic or did you change it along the way?

What problems did you encounter during the process of creating the essay? List two of the most important changes you made. Why did you make them? What part of your essay makes you the most proud? Lesson 21 Vocabulary Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: irony , protagonist , antagonist Reading Read about Henry David Thoreau.

There can be no very black melancholy to him who lives in the midst of nature. Find two other quotes capturing themes that are fitting. Write down why they are appropriate choices. Writing Read about Rhetorical Strategies writers use. Think about how some authors we have been studying use these strategies. Continue working on your essay due on Day Lesson 22 Vocabulary Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Read this excerpt Sections from Civil Disobedience.

Write a Response to Literature where you complete the following: Describe the historical background and reason why Thoreau wrote Civil Disobedience. Lesson 23 Vocabulary Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Read about Washington Irving. Are these happenings believable? Read Rip Van Winkle. Read over this study guide. Read each prompt and write a paragraph or two giving an answer. The second page is the answer key. Lesson 25 Vocabulary Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: setting , motif , onomatopoeia Writing Continue working on your Reflective Essay due on Day Lesson 27 Vocabulary Record these words and their definitions in your notes.

Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: tragedy , tragic flaw , monologue Reading Read about Herman Melville. Read about Moby Dick We are not going to have time to read the whole novel, but you should familiarize yourself with this novel. Read about Moby Dick as a great American novel. Read an analysis of major characters. Read about themes, motifs, and symbols. Continue working on your outside reading as assigned and your Reflective Essay due on Day When you see a definition or a link to a definition, record it as you were your previous vocabulary words. Sometimes they will repeat from earlier in the course. Make sure you know them well enough to identify them in use.

Read the definition of a poem. Read the definition of prosody. Review the difference between Poetry and Prose. In thinking about poetry, keep in mind that the form structure and the content of the poem contribute to the overall meaning of the poem. The form and the content also play a part in creating that desired effect on the reader. Everything has a purpose. Your essay should be pages in length. You should choose a poem we have not discussed in class. We will be talking about Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson soon. There are many poems by those two authors that would work well for this assignment. Or you might choose to revisit earlier authors Transcendentalists, Romanticists.

Remember to choose an American author from a time period we have covered so far. Use the poetry terms we have discussed in class as well as your own insight while reading the poem. A well-written explication will give the reader an idea of the literal meaning of the poem and also an analysis of its poetic devices. Include a copy of the poem you choose with your assignment. Read this handout about Poetry Explication. Use this Poetry Explication Rubric for grading. Some of these may overlap a bit in our discussion. Figurative language and its figures of speech can include similes , metaphors , personification, hyperbole , and cliche. The writer uses figurative language to describe something by comparing it with something else.

Imagery can be defined using our five senses. Lots of details and specific word choice are important for creating the exact image the reader should have in his or her mind while reading the text. Imagery often uses symbolism. Record your grade out of 21 not Writing Your Reflective Essay is due today. Follow the directions on the rubric and record your score. There are many ways sound devices can be used in poetry. This could be a question, a quote, a metaphor, or something else that catches the attention of your reader.

Include a few sentences of background information in your introduction that connects the hook to your thesis. A strong thesis will state your interpretation with confidence. Use this handout as you work on your poetry essay. Read about MEAL plan. It stands for: T: topic sentence I: introduce the quote by discussing the context of the quote Q: quote Give the quote itself. A: analysis Explain the importance of the quote and link it back to the topic sentence.

You may choose to repeat TIQA in the same paragraph. If you do this, the second T will stand for Transition. Use a sentence to transition from your first topic to your second topic. Keep it flowing naturally. We will be using an adaptation of a Read, Write, Think lesson plan. The original can be found here. This is a list poem or a catalog verse. You may also decide you want to write this about your church, a youth group, a homeschool co-op, or some other type of group like that. Do not start working on it yet. Whitman does not use specific names of people, but instead he uses occupations or their roles. Do the same with your poem. Use whatever your personal selection was to complete the planning sheet. You are going to be filling the blanks with people and their roles in your chosen selection.

You should circle the correct pronoun choices for the names that they use in the blanks on the handout. You will complete your poem tomorrow. Have them list some of the groups you mention in your poem. Think about your poem now. Are there any groups that you may have left out in your poem? Why do you think that omission may have happened? Writing Continue working on your poetry paper. Lesson 37 Reading Read about Emily Dickinson.

Writing Complete the Poetry Analysis Worksheet for one of the poems we read today. Use this study guide and compare what you came up with when you are done. Read about Harriet Beecher Stowe in the article about how she changed history. Read about Frederick Douglass. Read the plot overview of The Narrative of Frederick Douglass. Read about the themes of The Narrative of Frederick Douglass. Writing Continue working on your poetry essay. Remember it is due on Day If you prefer, you can read the transcript instead. This professor is talking about teaching this information, but the lecture contains valuable information for you.

Read about Frances Ellen Watkins Harper. This is also known as the era of Reconstruction. Verses 3—12 refer to the period during Slavery. Read about how some states made it illegal to teach a slave how to read and write. Use the annotation worksheet Teacher Version to see how well you did in your annotation. Read the plot overview of Little Women. Read about the themes of Little Women. Be prepared to turn it in tomorrow. Lesson 45 Your Poetry Explication Essay is due. Use this Poetry Explication Rubric and record the grade. Print off your Quarter 1 Exam and complete it. Vocabulary Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Take notes on what was significant about Naturalism and Realism.

The reading and assignment should be completed by Day Writing You will be writing a Rhetorical Analysis essay this quarter. It will be due on Day You will choose a piece of American nonfiction prose, particularly an essay or a speech. This should be a focused analysis of the writing. It is not supposed to be a summary or a personal critique. Use standard MLA format. The essay must be double-spaced, with one-inch margins all around. Please use a point, Times New Roman font. Give your essay a creative title. It should be pages long. Your essay will be graded using this Rhetorical Analysis Essay Rubric. Lesson 47 Vocabulary Record these words and their definitions in your notes.

Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: rhetoric , foreshadowing Reading Read about Mark Twain. Mark Twain is considered a Realist author and is especially known for writing local-color narratives regionalism. Read a summary of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. We will not have time to read this in this course, but it is an important novel to know.

Read about the themes of the novel Writing When you have chosen the rhetorical piece you would like to write your essay on, you should examine the historical context and the origin for your piece. What was going on in the nation at the time of this piece? How might that have fueled this piece being delivered? If this was a speech, when and where was it given? What is the significant of its time and location? Read about Elements of Rhetorical Situations. Lesson 48 Vocabulary Record these words and their definitions in your notes.

This is a frame narrative. The narrator retells a story he heard from a bartender, Simon Wheeler, about a gambler, Jim Smiley. The narrator tells his story in a first person point of view. The story within the story is in third-person and told by Simon Wheeler. Is the dialect a help in this story? What does it do for the setting and for characterization? What does it do for the plot development and the narration? How does this story fall into the category of Realism?

Use specifics from the text to answer this. Read How to Tell A Story. What is the tone of this essay? It is satire. What does Twain think is the reason writers go to such great lengths in their storytelling? They will choose to manipulate details to make them more interesting. They will repeat punch lines of jokes until they are no longer funny. Writing Look over your choice for your Rhetorical Analysis Essay. What is the Speaker, Occasion, and Subject?

What can you say about the speaker? Your paper should include their credentials. Is this an essay or speech by a president, a general, a head of an organization, etc.? Be sure to choose appropriate research methods and cite your sources correctly. What is the Purpose? What is the speaker trying to impress upon their audience? Use words to describe what the writer wants the audience to do or to think. Who is the Audience? When was this essay or speech delivered? To what group of people was it delivered?

What is the Tone? Lesson 49 Vocabulary Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: dramatic irony, situational irony, verbal irony Read through the link to find each definition. Reading Read about Ambrose Bierce. How does Bierce fit into Realism or Naturalism with this piece? Most critics say Bierce cannot be pinned down to a literary category. Write a a paragraph or two about how Bierce uses symbolism, suspense, and imagery in this story. He uses the chronology of the story almost like a movie with a flashback and foreshadowing. Where are some specific places he does this?

Discuss the imagery of the sluggish stream and the dancing driftwood. There is no need to grade this exercise. It is just for some additional practice. Writing Rhetorical Analysis Essay — How would you characterize the style of the piece you are analyzing? Review the different types of style here. Read about Text in The Rhetorical Situation. Lesson 50 Vocabulary Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: determinism , epigram , understatement Reading Today you should be done Chapters of The Red Badge of Courage as well as pages of the study guide. Writing When writing your analysis, you should work chronologically through the text.

You start at the beginning of the text and work your way through it. Depending on how long the text is and how it is organized you may be discussing paragraph by paragraph. Or it may be best to discuss the text in terms of sections with a beginning, middle, and end. Be sure to use proper transition words to demonstrate movement through the text and to clearly identify which portion you are discussing at that moment. Lesson 51 Vocabulary Record these words and their definitions in your notes.

Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: inference , mood , juxtapose Reading Read about Jack London. Read about The Call of the Wild. Read about themes and symbols. Use specific examples from the text in proper format. Simply choose the strongest ones, the ones that are most effective.

Read about Setting in The Rhetorical Situation. Lesson 52 Reading Read over the description of Naturalism. Write down the themes found on the Naturalism link. Some verbs are considered weak as their use is often for a summary. Weak verbs could include: says, relates, goes on to say, tells, this quote shows, explains, states, and shows. Stronger verbs useful for analysis may include: implies, trivializes, qualifies, describes, suggests, dismisses, analyzes, questions, compares, vilifies, praises, supports, contrasts, emphasizes, establishes, admonishes, argues, defines, ridicules, minimizes, etc.

Read Example 1 in The Rhetorical Situation. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: first-person; second-person; third-person. Read through the link to find each definition. How does Crane use irony to show that war is far from kind? It is 7 chapters long. For each of the chapters print off and complete the Student Activity Sheets to create a study guide for yourself. Writing An important part of rhetorical analysis will include analyzing diction. When the speaker chose a stronger alternative to a word instead of a simpler choice, you should pay attention to it.

Notice patterns such as repetition used by the writer. Does the pattern show emotion or emphasis? The author should use words that are purposeful with a meaning that is the exact meaning intended. Words can have an effect on the reader, so they must be chosen carefully. Read Example 2 in The Rhetorical Situation. Lesson 54 Vocabulary Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: stream of consciousness , pessimism , urbanization Reading Finish The Open Boat including any Student Activity Sheets for the remaining chapters.

Writing Diction will reflect the subject, purpose, occasion, and audience. This will influence the diction. If the purpose is to inform, then the diction may be more to the point. If the purpose is to entertain, there may be words used with irony or humorous ways. Read Example 3 in The Rhetorical Situation. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: industrialization , detachment , syntax Reading Today you should be done Chapters of The Red Badge of Courage as well as pages of the study guide. Writing An important part of rhetorical analysis will include analyzing syntax. Review the definition of syntax. Sentence length is one part of syntax. In short, you shouldn't believe everything Nick says, especially his snobbier asides, but you can take his larger characterizations and version of events seriously.

But as you read, try to separate Nick's judgments about people from his observations! A hero, or protagonist, is generally the character whose actions propel the story forward, who the story focuses on, and they are usually tested or thwarted by an antagonist. So in the most traditional sense, Gatsby is the hero —he drives the action of the story by getting Jordan and Nick to reintroduce him to Daisy which leads to the affair, confrontation in Manhattan, the death of Myrtle, and then the murder-suicide , he goes up against an antagonist of sorts Tom , and the story ends with his death.

Gatsby's story is thus a cynical take on the traditional rags-to-riches story. However, some people see the protagonist as also the person who changes the most in the course of a story. In this case, you might argue that since Nick changes a lot during the novel see below , while Gatsby during the story itself doesn't change dramatically his big character changes come before the chronology of the novel , that Nick is in fact the protagonist. Nick's story is a take on the coming of age narrative—he even has an important birthday 30 in the novel! Basically, if you think the protagonist is the character who propels the action of the story, and someone who has an antagonist, it's Gatsby.

But if you think the protagonist is the person who changes the most, you could argue Nick is the hero. We never get a physical description of Nick, so don't blame yourself if your mental image of him is bland and amorphous like this fellow. And so with the sunshine and the great bursts of leaves growing on the trees—just as things grow in fast movies—I had that familiar conviction that life was beginning over again with the summer. There was so much to read for one thing and so much fine health to be pulled down out of the young breath-giving air. As the summer goes on, he meets someone wildly more hopeful than he is—Gatsby, of course—and he begins to be more cynical in how he views his own life in comparison, realizing that there are certain memories and feelings he can no longer access.

Through all he said, even through his appalling sentimentality, I was reminded of something—an elusive rhythm, a fragment of lost words, that I had heard somewhere a long time ago. For a moment a phrase tried to take shape in my mouth and my lips parted like a dumb man's, as though there was more struggling upon them than a wisp of startled air. But they made no sound and what I had almost remembered was uncommunicable forever.

Finally, after the deaths of Myrtle, Gatsby, and Wilson, as well as the passing of his thirtieth birthday, Nick is thoroughly disenchanted, cynical, regretful, even angry, as he tries to protect Gatsby's legacy in the face of an uncaring world, as well as a renewed awareness of his own mortality. Angry, and half in love with her, and tremendously sorry, I turned away. After Gatsby's death the East was haunted for me like that, distorted beyond my eyes' power of correction. On the last night, with my trunk packed and my car sold to the grocer, I went over and looked at that huge incoherent failure of a house once more. On the white steps an obscene word, scrawled by some boy with a piece of brick, stood out clearly in the moonlight and I erased it, drawing my shoe raspingly along the stone.

Nick goes from initially taken with Gatsby, to skeptical, to admiring, even idealizing him, over the course of the book. When he first meets Gatsby in Chapter 3, he is drawn in by his smile and immediately senses a peer and friend, before of course Gatsby reveals himself as THE Jay Gatsby:. He smiled understandingly—much more than understandingly. It was one of those rare smiles with a quality of eternal reassurance in it, that you may come across four or five times in life. It faced—or seemed to face—the whole external world for an instant, and then concentrated on you with an irresistible prejudice in your favor. It understood you just so far as you wanted to be understood, believed in you as you would like to believe in yourself and assured you that it had precisely the impression of you that, at your best, you hoped to convey.

In Chapter 4, Nick is highly skeptical of Gatsby's story about his past, although he is somewhat impressed by the medal from "little Montenegro" 4. He looked at me sideways—and I knew why Jordan Baker had believed he was lying. He hurried the phrase "educated at Oxford," or swallowed it or choked on it as though it had bothered him before. And with this doubt his whole statement fell to pieces and I wondered if there wasn't something a little sinister about him after all. He also seems increasingly skeptical after his encounter with Meyer Wolfshiem, who Nick describes very anti-Semitically.

When Wolfshiem vouches for Gatsby's "fine breeding," 4. In Chapter 5, as Nick observes the reunion between Gatsby and Daisy, he first sees Gatsby as much more human and flawed especially in the first few minutes of the encounter, when Gatsby is incredibly awkward , and then sees Gatsby has transformed and "literally glowed" 5. Notice how warm Nick's description is:. But there was a change in Gatsby that was simply confounding. He literally glowed; without a word or a gesture of exultation a new well-being radiated from him and filled the little room 5.

In Chapter 6, Nick honestly and frankly observes how Gatsby is snubbed by the Sloanes, but he seems more like he's pitying Gatsby than making fun of him. It almost seems like he's trying to protect Gatsby by cutting off the scene just as Gatsby comes out the door, coat in hand, after the Sloanes have coldly left him behind:. Tom and I shook hands, the rest of us exchanged a cool nod and they trotted quickly down the drive, disappearing under the August foliage just as Gatsby with hat and light overcoat in hand came out the front door.

By Chapter 7, during the confrontation in the hotel, Nick is firmly on Gatsby's side, to the point that he is elated when Gatsby reveals that he did, in fact, attend Oxford but didn't graduate:. I wanted to get up and slap him on the back. I had one of those renewals of complete faith in him that I'd experienced before. As the rest of the novel plays out, Nick becomes more admiring of Gatsby, even as he comes to dislike the Buchanans and Jordan, by extension more and more. Why exactly Nick becomes so taken with Gatsby is, I think, up to the reader. In my reading, Nick, as someone who rarely steps outside of social boundaries and rarely gets "carried away" with love or emotion see how coldly he ends not one but three love affairs in the book!

Gatsby's fate also becomes entangled with Nick's own increased cynicism, both about his future and life in New York, so he clings to the memory of Gatsby and becomes determined to tell his story. At first, this might not seem plausible—Nick dates Jordan during the book and also admits to a few other love affairs with women and at one point confesses to being "half in love with [Jordan]. First of all, consider the odd moment at the end of Chapter 2 that seems to suggest Nick goes home with Mr. I was standing beside his bed and he was sitting up between the sheets, clad in his underwear , with a great portfolio in his hands.

Then I was lying half asleep in the cold lower level of the Pennsylvania Station, staring at the morning "Tribune" and waiting for the four o'clock train. Nick's narration is confused and sporadic as he was quite drunk after the party. However, what we do see—the elevator boy chiding him to "keep your hands off the lever" hint hint wink wink nudge nudge , shortly followed by Nick saying "I was standing beside [Mr. McKee's bed and he was sitting up between the sheets, clad in his underwear"—seems to pretty strongly suggest a sexual encounter. And in a novel that is so short and carefully constructed, why add this short scene unless it's supposed to help us understand Nick? Some people see that scene as a confirmation of Nick's sexual preference, or at least an indication he's attracted to men as well as women.

However, since this was the s, he couldn't exactly be out and proud, which is why he would never frankly admit to being attracted to men in his sober narration. So instead, as the theory goes, his love for and attraction to for Gatsby is mirrored through a filter of intense admiration. So, using this reading, The Great Gatsby is narrated by a man suffered from unrequited love. Do you have to take this reading as fact? Not at all. But if you're curious you can check out a fuller write-up of the "Nick as gay" reading and decide for yourself. These are questions students often have about Nick after reading the book, but ones that don't always come up in classroom discussions or essay topics.

Read on if you still have unanswered questions about Nick! Also, be sure to let us know in the comments if you have more questions about Nick! Nick says in his opening narration that most people in the east have earned his "unaffected scorn," so it's confusing to see him cozy up to Jordan in the next few chapters 1. However, keep in mind that scorn is earned over the course of the novel, and Nick writes the opening narration looking back at everything. So before the tragic conclusion, Nick actually is strongly attracted to Jordan and hasn't yet realized that her attractive skepticism actually means she can be callous and uncaring. Our quote above from Chapter 4, as Nick finds himself attracted to the "hard, clean, limited" Jordan, illustrates that strong initial attraction.

But post break-up, do they still feel anything for each other? Their break-up scene is really helpful to analyze to answer this question:. I don't give a damn about you now but it was a new experience for me and I felt a little dizzy for a while. Well, I met another bad driver, didn't I? I mean it was careless of me to make such a wrong guess. I thought you were rather an honest, straightforward person. I thought it was your secret pride. She didn't answer. Jordan, for her part, seems to admit to having genuinely liked Nick when they break up at the end and was quite hurt. And Nick, for once, is a mess of emotions: "angry" and "half in love. Of course, if you subscribe to the "Nick loves Gatsby" theory you could chalk much of this scene up to repressed desires, especially Nick's comment about not wanting to lie to himself.

This statement officially marks Nick's disillusionment with the East Coast, old money crowd. Remember that this line comes after the car accident, and the scene in the hotel just before that, so he's just seen Daisy and Tom's ugliest behavior. Nick is proud of the statement since it was one of the last things he ever got to say to Gatsby. What can be a bit harder to spot is when exactly Nick's earlier distrust of Gatsby morphed into respect. I argued above it begins in Chapter 5, when he watches Gatsby's reunion with Daisy and sees Gatsby transformed and enraptured by love. Nick sets the stage in Chapter 1 by first explaining why he can be trusted as a narrator. Read our summary of Chapter 1 for more analysis as to why Nick's opening makes him a bit suspicious as a narrator.

Want to read more about Nick and Jordan's relationship? Curious as to why they get together despite their differences in background? Read about love, desire, and relationships in Gatsby for more on their relationship. Did Fitzgerald see himself as more of a Carraway or a Gatsby? Read our history of F. Scott Fitzgerald's life for more on the man behind the book. We've written a guide for each test about the top 5 strategies you must be using to have a shot at improving your score. Download it for free now:. Halle Edwards graduated from Stanford University with honors.

She also took nine AP classes, earning a perfect score of 5 on seven AP tests. As a graduate of a large public high school who tackled the college admission process largely on her own, she is passionate about helping high school students from different backgrounds get the knowledge they need to be successful in the college admissions process. Our new student and parent forum, at ExpertHub. See how other students and parents are navigating high school, college, and the college admissions process. Ask questions; get answers. How to Get a Perfect , by a Perfect Scorer. Score on SAT Math. Score on SAT Reading. Score on SAT Writing. What ACT target score should you be aiming for?

How to Get a Perfect 4. How to Write an Amazing College Essay. A Comprehensive Guide. Choose Your Test. Nick Carraway is The Great Gatsby' s narrator, but he isn't the protagonist main character. Nick Carraway's Background Nick grew up in the "middle West," what we call the Midwest , in a wealthy family that was "something of a clan" 1. Nick's Actions in the Novel This is a summary of everything Nick does during the novel, leaving out flashbacks he hears from other characters. Perhaps the least subtle car in the history of cars. Key Nick Carraway Quotes In my younger and more vulnerable years my father gave me some advice that I've been turning over in my mind ever since.

McKee with dignity, "I didn't know I was touching it. Old Grocery Horse.

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