A Shadow Of A Doubt Scene Analysis

Wednesday, October 20, 2021 2:02:57 AM

A Shadow Of A Doubt Scene Analysis



I've curated essay topic breakdown videos based Deviance And Crime As A Society specific VCE texts. Further information: Pirated movie Compare And Contrast Gandhi And Osiris types. Two of my favourite quotes from Life of Galileo are: 'Science is the rightful, much loved daughter Materialism In American Society the church. You can compare Comrades Almost A Love Story Analysis with Game. The mere telling helps me to Unhealthy Food Proposal confidence in my own faculties; to reassure myself that I was not Compare And Contrast Gandhi And Osiris the first to succumb to a contagious nightmare hallucination. When it comes to analysing - Daisy Fay In The Great Gatsby you know I've got an edited version for Fear Of Death In The Poem To Venus By Lucretius - you don't see me thinking through and understanding what's happening in the article itself.

Teresa Wright Discusses Shadow Of A Doubt (1943)

If your teacher or school teaches you something slightly different - that's okay too. At the end of the day the foundations are the same. The first part follows their childhood, and their interactions with characters such as Boo Radley, Walter Cunningham, Miss Caroline and Mrs Dubose, while the second part follows the Tom Robinson trial itself, testing the children on the moral lessons of their childhood and disillusioning them to the overwhelming racism of their community. All throughout the novel resonate messages of tolerance over prejudice. However, before any question of race is introduced, the children must confront their prejudices about Boo Radley, a local recluse who was rumoured to have attacked his parents.

What is prejudice, after all? In the second part of the novel, these moral questions around prejudice and empathy find an arena in the courtroom, where Tom has been unfairly charged with rape and is being defended by Atticus. The intersection of these themes—race, prejudice and justice—forces us to confront the reality that our legal institutions may not be as colour-blind and impartial as we thought.

All of that sounds pretty dire, so is the novel then purely pessimistic? In Part One, we find an unlikely hero in Mrs. Another example of Atticus switching up what it means to be heroic is in the way he puts down Tim Johnson. Atticus transforms this into yet another lesson about courage: "I wanted you to see what real courage is, instead of getting the idea that courage is a man with a gun in his hand. This knowledge seems to be one of those unfortunate things that comes with age and life experience. Thus, on the one hand, you have this disillusionment and loss on innocence, but on the other, you also have this shift in worldview that may well be valuable in the long run. Scout experiences similar disappointments, and they both grapple with other questions of conscience, tolerance and conformity throughout the novel.

Walter Cunningham and Mrs. Dubose are covered above, but try to form some of these connections yourself. Boo Radley is the key character who connects the two parts of the story. He spends much of the first part in hiding, occasionally leaving gifts for the kids in a tree chapter 7 , or giving them a blanket during a fire chapter 8. In the second part however, he emerges to save Jem from Bob Ewell and is actually a rather unassuming man.

In many ways, the first part of the novel sets up and drives these ideas home. I have ample firsthand experience. So is there an issue when a story of Black injustice only elevates white people as heroes? Which brings us to a topic that is a bit knottier than it might first seem. This means that you might agree for a paragraph or two, emphasising the importance of context, before expanding on this idea of courage in the third. In your opinion, what is the most central and relevant message from To Kill a Mockingbird? Challenge: In To Kill a Mockingbird , how are isolation and loneliness different, and what is Lee suggesting about society in this regard? Something that I want you to take away from this video is being able to develop a contention statement that is a complete, solid foundation for your essay.

It generally means bravery and fearlessness, but what kinds of courage are explored in the novel? Immediately, we can see that this is a theme-based prompt. You could contend that the novel is indeed about courage, as Atticus not only teaches it to his children but also applies it to his defence of Tom Robinson in the face of structural racism. However, courage is also linked more broadly to empathy, which is explored as a panacea for discrimination. A complete contention like this breaks up your points neatly, but also grounds everything you have to say in an essay that still addresses the question and the idea of courage. For example, paragraph one would start by looking at the forms of courage he teaches to his children. Not only does he teach his children about the importance of courage, but he goes on to exemplify those very lessons himself.

However, in the final paragraph we might take a bit of a turn. Atticus, in having the courage to see Tom as an equal, is probably reflecting another very important value in the novel—namely, empathy. Though he admires Mrs. The idea of empathy as a form of courage is also reflected in what he teaches them about Boo Radley. In other words, he sees empathy as a form of courage in being the first to break social stigmas and overcome the various forms of discrimination that separate us.

Now to touch base again with the take away message. We contended that the novel is about courage because Atticus teaches it to Scout and Jem while also representing it in the trial. We also contended that courage is linked to empathy, another key value that he imparts as it helps to overcome social barriers like discrimination. The aim was to build an essay on a contention that clearly props up the body of the essay itself, even when we were more confident with some other themes, and I think this plan does a pretty good job of covering that. As the text is set in the backdrop of rapid Australian modernisation, the novel also depicts the paradoxical nature of technology, as various characters are depicted to be torn between confronting or embracing this fundamental change.

Kennedy explores the theme of identity mainly through physical injury, as various characters with physical trauma find themselves to be agonisingly limited within the confines of their condition. The inherent tension between order and chaos is continually examined throughout the anthology, particularly in Like a House on Fire, in which perfectionistic order and scatter minded disorder are embodied in the unnamed narrator and his wife respectively. As the two individuals are unable to establish a compromise between their contrasting personalities, Kennedy suggests that this lack of cooperation is the core reason for the deterioration of their marriage, and their subsequent misery.

Each protagonist in the collection is portrayed as possessing some object of longing, whether it be material or emotional. Kennedy utilises scattered verses of prose within her writing to communicate these human desires, building upon their significance poetically. In Static , Anthony attempts to negotiate his own wishes with those of his wife and family, leading him to wonder whether anything present in his life has been created by his own will or merely his eagerness to please others. His desire for various types of happiness, embodied in material concepts such as money or children, suggest that the human condition is built upon the foundation of dissatisfaction; that innate longing is what ultimately defines us as human.

The theme of love is present in each story of the collection, often used as an instrument through which the characters can heal and grow from their physical or spiritual pain. While suggesting that true love endures all hardship in Like a House on Fire , Kennedy also illustrates the various sacrifices one must make in order to protect the ones you love. The vital importance of communication within families is emphasised in the anthology, as the lack of effective communication perceivably exacerbates dysfunctional relationships. The crushing regret of a son is explored in Ashes , as he laments his lack of communication with his father who he can no longer speak to.

However, Kennedy empathetically depicts the difficulty of communicating potentially painful messages to loved ones in Waiting , as the protagonist anxiously agonises over the prospect of telling her husband that she may have another miscarriage following an excruciating string of lost children. In tandem with longing, Kennedy asserts that empathy is vital to the survival and happiness of a human being. Similarly, the salient importance of empathy is emphasised in Flexion , as the cold-heated and harsh victim of a brutal tractor incident repairs his marriage by allowing himself to feel more empathy for those who have supported his recovery and been understanding of his bitterness. The anthology centres around the concept of family, as both dramatic events unfold directly due to altercations and misunderstanding within the household.

By depicting both the dramatic and mundane events that contribute to creating dysfunctional families, Kennedy asserts that kindness and understanding is vital to the maintenance of a healthy and loving family. By the way, to download a PDF version of this blog for printing or offline use, click here! Download a PDF version of this blog for printing or offline use. Like a House on Fire. How to embed quotes in your essay like a boss. The Importance of the Introduction. Below I will outline 3 tips which, will hopefully give you a clearer perspective on how to approach writing on Frankenstein! Since the book was set during the Age of Enlightenment and the Romantic era, Shelley essentially used Frankenstein as a vessel to criticise and warn readers against many of the values upheld during her era.

The late 18th century and the first decades of the 19th century were exciting times for science and exploration. Walton wanted to be the first to find a passage through the Arctic Circle; Frankenstein wanted to be the first to create manmade life, to uncover the mysteries of Nature. Both men claimed to be desirous of benefitting humankind but both wanted glory more. This obsession to win accolades for their discoveries will destroy Victor, and turn Walton for a while into a hard taskmaster over his crew. Juxtaposed against these two characters is Henry Clerval.

Clerval, too, has an inquiring mind but he also cares about humanity, family and friends. He represents the balanced human being who is sociable, compassionate, intelligent and loyal to his friends. In his inexperience he botches the work producing a hideous and terrifying creature with, ironically, initially all the virtues of the ideal man of he world. Repulsed by his amateurish handiwork, Victor abandons his creation, setting in place the vengeance that will unfold later. It was this praise that drove Walton and Frankenstein to exceed reasonable expectations becoming reckless and careless of the consequences of their actions. Walton, Frankenstein and the Creature are interconnected in so many ways — whether it be their isolation, ambition, desire for companionship, desire for vengeance or the Romantic values they share.

What I mean by this is that there is a clearly define relationship between isolation, ambition and vengeance and ultimately tragedy in the sense that isolation is what led to the brewing of unchecked ambition which essentially causes the resultant tragedy. Being able to see these links and draw them together will not only add depth to your writing but it also arms you with the ability to be able to deal with a wider array of prompts. While Walton, Frankenstein and the Creature can be discussed incredibly thoroughly and by all means go ahead and do it , but it is also very important to consider the novel as a whole and talk about, if not more thoroughly, on the minor characters.

Henry Clerval like previously mentioned can be contrasted against Walton and his best friend Frankenstein to show that as long as we have a balanced lifestyle and companionship, ambition will not lead us to ruin. Characters such as the Turkish merchant can also have parallels drawn with Frankenstein in telling how our selfish desire and actions, born out of inconsideration for their consequences, can backfire with great intensity. Mentioning these characters and utilising these contrasts can be monumental in showing your understanding of the novel and by extension, your English analytical ability. Today, we're going to be talking about Frankenstein and breaking down an essay topic for it.

So in the past, I've done plenty of videos looking at different types of essay topics and breaking them down by looking at keywords and then going into the body paragraphs and looking at those ideas. This time round, the takeaway message that I want you to leave with is understanding what types of evidence you should be using inside your body paragraphs. Specifically, I wanted to talk about literary devices or metalanguage.

Mary Shelley, the author of Frankenstein uses so many literary devices that it's impossible to ignore. If you are somebody who is studying this text or other texts that you use and are heavily embedded with literary techniques, then it's really important that you don't just use dialogue as part of your quotes, but actually reading between the lines. I'll teach you on how it's not just about finding dialogue, which you include as quotes inside your body paragraphs, but reading between the lines, so looking at literary devices like metaphors, symbols, imagery, so let's get started. Mary Shelley's Frankenstein constitutes escaping critique of the prioritization of scientific advancement over human welfare and relationship.

Frankenstein is fascinated with science and discovery, he is consumed with the idea of a new and more noble race by stitching up dead body parts from a cemetery. He feverishly works away at his experiment until one day the creature is born. Frankenstein is horrified at the living thing he has made and completely rejects the creature, leaving it without a parental figure. The creature is left alone to look after himself. He educates himself and on repeated occasions tries to approach people in society, however, is rejected every time because of his monstrous appearance.

As a result, the creature becomes enraged at humanity and Frankenstein's unfair treatment towards him and consequently exacts revenge on Frankenstein and his family. The essay topic we'll be looking at today is, Our sympathies in this novel ultimately lie with the creature. So in previous videos, we've looked at keywords, how to identify them and how to define them.

Since it's pretty straightforward for this essay topic, I thought I would skip that part and then go into the more nitty gritty with the body paragraphs. But, if you are unfamiliar with these steps, then I'll link them in the card above and also in the description below so you can have a look at how I went ahead and did the keyword section in my planning, now back to the prompt. Unequivocally within Frankenstein, Shelley portrays sympathy as spread throughout the text through depicting the creature as innately human through his desire for relationship and the challenges he faces at the hands of the prejudice enlightenment society he's born into, Shelley elicits sympathy for his situation.

However, through the notable absence of the female gender throughout the text, Shelley portrays those silent within society as most deserving of sympathy. So, with this in mind, here are the potential paragraphs in response to this prompt. Paragraph one, Shelley's depiction of the creature as innately human motivates support for his challenges at the hands of a prejudice society. The action of the creature to open his dull yellow eye, symbolic of his nature as a human being alongside a green wrinkled on his cheeks, with one hand stretched out, indicates his simple desire for paternal connection.

Through constructing the creature's actions as innately human Shelley acts proleptically of the inequitable experiences the creature will experience throughout the structural architecture of the text. And through doing so, depicts his character as worthy of support. Similarly, through the metaphor of fire, Shelley explores the duality of progress and innovation of which the creature desires. The fire, one that gives light as well as heat, yet also causes a cry of pain, indicates the hardships of the creature in his isolation, whereby, his forced to withdraw from his desire for education.

Upon viewing himself in a pool, the creature becomes "fully convinced that I was in reality [a] monster" with the consequent sensations of despondency and mortification granting the reader the opportunity to sympathize with the creature in order to indicate the intensely negative social prejudices that are inflicted upon the creature. So you can see that we've looked at symbols of the creature's nature and the metaphor of fire to support our topic sentence. Using literary techniques is what's going to make the difference between you and another student who might be saying the same thing. Because when you look at literary devices, it means that you're reading just beyond the lines, just beyond what's in front of you.

You're now introducing your own interpretation, so you're looking at fire and thinking about what that means in connection to the text, and why Mary Shelley would use the term of a fire and revolve her discussion around that. So let's see how we keep doing this in the next body paragraph. Paragraph two, Shelley indicates the significance of relationships as a key element of human nature that the creature is denied, motivating affinity from readers. In replacement of human relationships, the creature rather seeks comfort within the natural world. The metaphorical huge cloak that the creature takes refuge within indicates this, illustrative of an ecosystem, the forest allows the creator to surround himself with life. The subsequent attempts to "imitate the pleasant songs of the birds" reveals the desperate urge of the creature for companionship as he is abandoned by the paternal relationship represented by Victor Frankenstein, which forms a core of human relationships.

Again, here we've discussed the metaphorical huge cloak and its connection with the forest, I strongly encourage you to have the goal of discussing at least one literary device per body paragraph. And no, there is no such thing as talking about too many literary devices because it's really just about whether or not your argument is concise and whether or not you're backing that up with evidence. Paragraph three. However, it is Shelley's depiction of the submissive female sex within Frankenstein that becomes most deserving of sympathy.

Each female character is characterized as passive, disposable, and they're serving a utilitarian function, namely as a channel of action for the male characters within the text. Notably, the complete lack of absence of Margaret Saville, functioning only as an audience for Walton's letters exemplifies this. Margaret's role within the text is simply to enable Walton to relay the story of Frankenstein and as such were the most necessary character of the texts whilst the most distant. This ironic dichotomy enables Shelley to exemplify the difficult role of the female within society, arising sympathy from the readership.

Here, even the purposeful emission of a character is discussed as a language technique. So, this type of literary device definitely tops the cake because you're literally looking at what's not even there. That's definitely reading between the lines. Frankenstein is a very complex novel, and sometimes that's what makes it a difficult text to study. But, it lends itself to many unique interpretations and it's heavily dressed with heaps of literary devices or metalanguage, however you want to call it. So, that's what makes it an absolutely fantastic text for high school students to study. If you wanted to find out more on how to nail a Frankenstein essay, then I'll link you to my blog just down below, because there are definitely more tips there to help you excel in this particular text.

Thank you so much for watching, and especially even if you're not studying this text, I hope you've been able to take something away from this video. And I'm confident that you have because talking about literary devices is definitely a topic that isn't necessarily the fore front of discussion in classrooms, and it's something that a lot of people struggle with. So, I hope you are able to walk away with a new goal in sight in order to improve your English essays. So, I will see you guys next time, thank you so much for joining me, see you guys soon.

Not gonna lie, this novel is a bit of a tricky one to introduce. World War II, arguably one of the darkest events of human history, has been the basis of so much writing across so many genres; authors, academics, novelists have all devoted themselves to understanding the tragedies, and make sense of how we managed to do this to one another. Many reflect on the experiences of children and families whose lives were torn apart by the war. In some ways, Doerr is another author who has attempted this. His novel alludes to the merciless anonymity of death in war, juxtaposes individualism with collective national mindlessness, and seeks out innocence amidst the brutality of war.

What makes this novel difficult to introduce is the way in which Doerr has done this; through the eyes of two children on opposite sides of the war, he explores how both of them struggle with identity, morality and hope, each in their own way. Their storylines converge in the bombing of Saint-Malo, demonstrating that war can be indiscriminate in its victims—that is, it does not care if its victims are children or adults, innocent or guilty, French or German. However, their interaction also speaks to the humanity that lies in all of us, no matter how deeply buried. Disclaimer: this is a very, very broad overview of the novel and it is absolutely not a substitute for actually reading it please actually read it.

Chronologically, we start in , five years before the war. As she starts to go blind, Daniel teaches her Braille, and makes her wooden models of their neighbourhood to help her navigate. Meanwhile, she befriends Etienne, who suffers from agoraphobia as a result of the trauma from the First World War. He is charming and very knowledgeable about science, having made a series of scientific radio broadcasts with his brother Henri who died in WWI.

She also befriends his cook, Madame Manec, who participates in the resistance movement right up until she falls ill and dies. Her father is also arrested and would ultimately die in prison , and the loss of their loved ones prompts both Etienne and Marie-Laure to begin fighting back. Marie-Laure is also given a key to a grotto by the seaside which is full of molluscs, her favourite kind of animal. On the other side of the war, Werner is, in , an 8 year-old German boy growing up in an orphanage with his sister Jutta in the small mining town of Zollverein.

One day, he repairs the radio of a Nazi official, who recruits him to the Hitler Youth on account of his ingenuity and his very blonde hair and very blue eyes, considered to be desirable traits by the regime. Jutta grows increasingly distant from Werner during this time, as she questions the morality of the Nazis. Werner is trained to be a soldier along with a cohort of other boys, and additionally learns to use radio to locate enemy soldiers. He befriends Frederick, an innocent kid who was only there because his parents were rich—Frederick would eventually fall victim to the brutality of the instructors, and Werner tries to quit out of solidarity.

Unfortunately, he is sent into the army to apply his training to actual warfare. He fights with Frank Volkheimer, a slightly ambiguous character who a tough and cruel soldier, but also displays a capacity to be kind and gentle including a fondness for classical music. The war eventually takes them to Saint-Malo. Also around or so, a Nazi sergeant, Reinhold von Rumpel, begins to track down the Sea of Flames. He would have been successful ultimately had it not been for Werner, who stops him in order to save Marie Laure. As America begins to turn the war around, Werner is arrested and dies after stepping on a German landmine; Marie-Laure and Etienne move back to Paris.

Marie-Laure eventually becomes a scientist specialising in the study of molluscs and has an extensive family of her own by What kind of questions does Doerr raise through this plot? To some degree, the single central question of the novel is one of humanity, and this manifests in a few different ways. Firstly, to what extent are we in control of our own choices? Do we truly have free will to behave morally? The Nazi regime throws a spanner in the works here, as it makes incredibly inhumane demands on its people. Perhaps they fear punishment and have no choice—Werner, for instance, does go along with everything. At the same time, his own sister manages to demonstrate critical thinking and moral reasoning well beyond her years, and it makes you wonder if there was potential for Werner to be better in this regard.

That being said, Werner is far from the only character who struggles with this—consider the perfumer, Claude Levitte, who becomes a Nazi informer, or even ordinary French citizens who simply accept the German takeover. Do they actually have free will to resist, or is it even moral for them to do so? This is what allowed people to do evil things without actually feeling or even being inherently evil—they were just taking orders, after all.

Consider the role of free will in this context. Etienne and Madame Manec, for instance, even disagree on the morality of resistance, which can frequently involve murder. At the same time, the climactic event of the novel is an allied bombing of Saint-Malo, a French town, just because it had become a German outpost. On a more optimistic note, a human quality that Doerr explores is our natural curiosity towards science. This is abundant in the childhoods of both protagonists, as Werner demonstrates dexterity with the radio at a very young age, and Marie-Laure a keen interest in marine biology.

In particular, her blindness pushes her into avenues of science which she can experience without literal sight, such as the tactile sensations of mollusc shells. The title may hint at this—for all the light she cannot see, she seeks enlightenment through knowledge, which in turn gives her hope, optimism and purpose. This alludes to the banality of evil again; by focusing on his very technical role and his unique understanding of the science behind radios, he is able to blind himself to the bigger picture of the evils he is abetting.

Science is something that is so innately human, yet can also be used inhumanely as well. One major symbol is the radio , with its potential for good as well as for evil. On one hand, it is undoubtedly used for evil purposes, but it also acts as a source of hope, purpose, conviction and connection in the worst of times. It is what ultimately drives Werner to save Marie-Laure. Along the same vein, whelks are also a major symbol, particularly for Marie-Laure. While an object of her fascination, they also represent strength for her, as they remain fixed onto rocks and withstand the beaks of birds who try to attack them. As Saint-Malo is destroyed and the Sea of Flames discarded, it is the seaside ecosystem that manages to live on, undisturbed. In this sense, the diamond can be seen as a manifestation of human greed, harmless once removed from human society.

They represent his immense love for her, and more broadly the importance of family, but the models also attempt to shrink entire cities into a predictable, easily navigable system. The models are an oversimplification of life, and an illusion of certainty, in a time when life was complicated and not at all certain for anyone. Identity, morality and hope—these things pretty much shape what it means to be human. Throughout All the Light We Cannot See though, characters sometimes struggle with all three of them at the same time. And yet they always manage to find something within themselves, some source of strength, some sense of right and wrong, some humanity in trying times.

In this novel, Anthony Doerr tells the World War 2 story through a unique lens, or rather a unique combination of lenses, as he sets a year-old French girl and a year-old German boy on an unlikely path of convergence. Darkness in this sense could be any number of things. Now, how should we plan for this topic? For our first paragraph, a good starting point might be analysing the literal forms of darkness in the novel, and seeing what other interpretations we can get from those.

The title could be seen as an allusion to her character and by extension, the hopelessness that blindness might cause in the midst of a war. But, across these two layers of meaning, could there perhaps be some room to challenge these interpretations? This is something we should look at for our final paragraph. These manifestations of light also require you to think about the different symbolic layers of the novel.

Consider how, just as darkness has levels of interpretation and symbolism in this book, so does light and hope and joy, rather than just evil and cruelty. Always delving deeper for meaning helps you to really make use of the symbols, imagery and motifs in a text, and I hope this novel in particular illustrates that idea. Here are some extremely useful tips that I have acquired from completing both Japanese and Chinese listening exams. They are very applicable to the EAL exam and will hopefully make you feel more confident about this new component!

I just need to write down the correct answer, it's a piece of cake. The VCAA examiners will look at the accuracy of your answer, grammar and spelling. They even look at how well you phrase your response! I hope you are! Give it a go, it is not as scary as you think! For many students, writing creative pieces can be slightly daunting. For some, it is about unleashing the writer within as the boundaries and thematic constraints that exist in Text Response are lifted. For others, it can be an opportunity to discover new writing styles, branching out from the generic T-E-E-L structure. Writing in an imaginative style allows you to draw from your own morals, views and feelings.

You can weave in personal anecdotes, experiences, and metaphorical language which gives one's writing that pizazz and individualist factor! Alternatively, you can step into different personas. For example, for the topic of conflict, I can write as an injured army medic, a doctor, a foreign correspondent and a war photographer. However, imaginative writing also has many pitfalls students tumble into do not despair; you can get out of it! Great imaginative pieces are not only graded on how good your story telling skills are. More importantly, your teachers would be grading on the palpable links to the themes of the text and prompt you have been given.

In Year 11, when I wrote an imaginative piece, I went overboard with the flowery metaphorical language. So, those radical and out-of-the box ideas and views you have in relation to the text can now be used. For example, the overarching themes in Every Man In This Village Is A Liar encompass the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, inequality the unequal status of women in Middle East , the effect of war on the physical body and the human psych and, how the media portrays war and violence. The starting point to planning any context piece is to use quotes and ideas within your text. Infer meaning from those quotes and main ideas and ask yourself:.

So, here's an example of planning a creative piece. Two of my favourite quotes from Life of Galileo are:. In essence, this conveys the overarching theme of science vs. Their fear of change, pioneering and gaining of new knowledge stems from the prospect of chaos if society's entrenched values are uprooted. I interpreted this as 'ignorance is not bliss' and instead, it breeds fear in people. In the context of our modern society, religion and science still maintain an intriguing and tumultuous relationship.

As the advancement of technology and ethics are not at equilibrium, this is where controversy arises. Conversely, we now have to consider whether this relates to the prompt:. Is it deemed humane to potentially change a person's character? At what personal cost will this have? A lot of students believe that the reading and creating essay is exactly the same as the old context essay. However, there is a significant difference! While a creative context essay does not have to link to the text in any way and only needs to explore a certain idea e. The easiest way to write a creative response that links clearly to the text is to write about a scenario that is related to the plot line.

You can do this by writing a continuation of the storyline i. In this way, your response will be completely original and still demonstrate an understanding of the world of the text. When creating your response, be aware of the features present in your text such as characters, narrative, motifs etc that you can use in your own essay. For example, if the text is narrated from a first-person perspective, you may also mimic this in your essay.

You may also include motifs from the text into your own response. But be careful when making decisions about structure, conventions and language. If the text is written in very formal and concise language, it is probably not a good idea to use slang. Similarly, if the text is a play, structuring your response as a script might be a better choice than writing a poem! Lastly, remember that whilst it is a creative response, your purpose is NOT to tell a nice story but to explore the ideas, values and messages left by the author!

There will always be various interpretations regarding these values, and you can express your understanding of the text through your portrayal of certain characters, or through the events in your response. For example, if you were studying Measure for Measure and wanted to explore how human nature cannot be restrained or limited by law and punishment, you could write a continuation of the play in which the city of Vienna has reverted to its original state of moral decay.

Creative essays are great because they offer interesting and unique stories; however, there is one common downfall that occurs in writing. Some students create pieces that are too straightforward. Rather than using vocabulary, imagery and symbolism to express a point, they simply write down a statement that sums up what they wish to say. Your aim is to invite the reader to experience the story through your words. Little wrinkles appeared around her bright eyes, her dimples made an appearance that dug into her cheeks as a big grin emerged to show her perfect teeth. Show: Guilt throbbed inside her as she stared at the weeping children.

Her heart pounded against her chest, her hands trembling beside her still body, her brain screaming at her to do something. Show: I hear my breathing; heavy, and rapid. I shut my eyes tightly. I can feel goosebumps running up my arms and down my back. Finally, have fun and enjoy the process of planning a creative narrative, let your imagination run a little wild and rein it in with your knowledge! Hopefully these tips were helpful and you are now more confident and informed on the Reading and Creating response! Happy learning!

Hey guys. Welcome back to Lisa's Study Guides. Right now, it's in the middle of December, and I know that most of you should have finished school by now, and you're enjoying your school holidays. Because it is summer holidays, and most people aren't really studying right now, this is for the truly keen beans, the people who are reading the text before the school starts, which, by the way, you should be doing. I'll pop that video in a card up above and so if you are studying Burial Rites, then this video is for you. If you're not, as always, it doesn't really matter because the type of advice that I will be giving would definitely be relevant to any text, because it's more about your thinking and how you actually go around approaching essay topics.

This book covers the last few months of her life, living with these people who she's sharing her story with. She has been sentenced because she has murdered Natan. And although we first initially hear that she has murdered this guy, when we start to hear her story develop, that's when we start to see that there are shades of gray. That she did have reason behind what she did, and you can start to feel quite sympathetic towards her. At the same time, though, and this is what today's essay question will be about. There's a lot to do with the patriarchy. Agnes being not just a woman, but an intelligent woman, was something that was looked down upon, and people were scared of that.

That's just to give you a little bit of context so that we can start this essay topic. What are the keywords here? To me, they are women, no power, patriarchy and dominates. These words really stand out to me, and these are the words that I feel are necessary for me to focus on in order to answer this prompt properly. The second step that I do is I define keywords. So what I do here is I try to understand what the keywords mean and also their implications. So this is how I'm going to break down this essay prompt. I am going to do two body paragraphs where I agree and one body paragraph where I disagree. So this should mean that I'm only agreeing to a certain extent.

Here's a video about this type of essay structure and response:. So my first body paragraph is yes, under male authority, the women are robbed of freedom and power. My example for that would be Agnes, who is the protagonist. She is a woman who's being sentenced to death for murdering Natan, more about him later, and, as a result, society condemns her and she's robbed of her identity and freedom. My second body paragraph would be another agreement, but this time I'm going to focus on the men. In this second body paragraph, my argument is men hold exploitative power over women.

One, Natan, the person who was murdered, toys with all his whores, demonstrating male dominance in s Iceland. All his workmaids are stranded, shipwrecked with nowhere else to go, highlighting women's hopelessness in changing their situation. Additionally, there's Blondal. So Blondal is a government authority and he's torn when commanding Lauga, Lauga, not too sure how to say that. You guys let me know. The third one is one where I disagree. Here will be that there are rare instances of female empowerment in the novel. The first one will be Rosa, the poet. So Rosa has an affair with Natan, but Kent praises Rosa and she's described to be a wonderful woman and beautiful. Rosa transcends patriarchal structures, as she is assertive, headstrong, going against social codes in an act of female empowerment.

The second one will be Agnes. Her storytelling and ability to express what she is inside allows her to gain a voice in the patriarchal world that has silenced her. Through her storytelling, she asserts her self-worth and dignity and despite the fact that she has been locked down, she is being treated like crap by the men, her ability to hold herself strong and to be able to face her death with dignity means that with some sense, at least from within, that sense of empowerment has not been completely diminished. Here are over 20 Oral Presentation Ideas for you if you're presenting a speech on Australian issues in the media.

See last year's Oral Presentation Ideas here. Best of luck! I have done these Analysing Argument pieces before on YouTube, but this is the first time that I'm doing one live. I wanted to do one live with you guys because I wanted to interact with you, for you to be able to ask me questions and for you to see how my brain works in a live setting. When it comes to analysing - and you know I've got an edited version for you - you don't see me thinking through and understanding what's happening in the article itself. So, I think it will be really handy for you to see my thought processes because sometimes, yeah, you can see somebody's analysis, but if you don't quite understand HOW they arrived at that analysis, then it's not that helpful for you.

How did they find that language technique to begin with? How did they find that argument? So that's what I want to work with you guys today. If you've already read it before, even if you've done it before, I'm confident I'll still be able to give you some new, interesting perspectives and to pick out some new language techniques for you guys. So, go ahead and make sure you download that and print it out. I think printing things out is usually a better option than trying to annotate online, unless you've got an iPad or equivalent. The exam is absolutely free - it's the last few pages of the exam, starting at page Let's just get into it. Then you can take it from the very beginning the analysis , then the annotations and then you can finally see the written-up version.

Being able to take you through that entire process from start to finish is going to be so wholesome, so fabulous. Whenever you look at section C, which is Analysing Argument also called Language Analysis I'm going to interchange these two terms , you really need to ensure that you read the background information. I know it's super obvious, but background information is there for a reason, do not skip over it! They didn't just give you an entire extra page just for the sake of it. Usually, the background information is a really great place for you to understand conceptually what is going on in this article.

If we didn't have this background and therefore context to the article, there's a chance that you might accidentally come up with the wrong contention. You might misinterpret the arguments as something else. The background information is really just there for backup. It's a great place for you to ensure that what you're understanding from the article is actually correct because usually the background information is filled with facts and these facts will help shape your understanding of the article. Interesting - 'transcript of a speech' is something that makes me go already yep, I need to make sure I note this because as soon as I recognise that it's a speech, it means that my audience, I don't call them readers, I call them listeners.

Simple things, small things will help differentiate you from other students. Someone else might not pick up that this is a speech and they'll just say readers the entire time. And no, you're not really going to get marks deducted for it, but there's an element of finesse I suppose. If you just notice that small nuance and you're able to present that in your essay, it makes the examiner or assessor more confident that you know what you're doing.

It's interesting because I'm already getting this community vibe from this background information. The fact that it's regional Victoria, the fact that it's actually a very specific council, the fact that he's at a public meeting. People have taken time out of their day to go to the council meeting. Who goes to the council meeting? People who care. This is just something that I'm kind of noting for myself as I go into my analysis because then I'll be able to develop my analysis in a particular way. Okay, cool, all this does is tell me that I just need to be wary that there are two images and that I, as a student, need to talk about them. He says, 'Good evening, everyone', already indicative of a speech, I'm just going to write that down. Remember that it's a speech!

Okay, this is what I think when I read an article, I genuinely think about my own personal response. I imagine this midnight moment's forest: Something else is alive Beside the clock's loneliness And this blank page where my fingers move. Through the window I see no star: Something more near though deeper within darkness Is entering the loneliness: Cold, delicately as the dark snow A fox's nose touches twig, leaf; Two eyes serve a movement, that now And again now, and now, and now Sets neat prints into the snow Between trees, and warily a lame Shadow lags by stump and in hollow Of a body that is bold to come Across clearings, an eye, A widening deepening greenness, Brilliantly, concentratedly, Coming about its own business Till, with a sudden sharp hot stink of fox, It enters the dark hole of the head.

The window is starless still; the clock ticks, The page is printed. The Thought Fox is a six stanza poem, all quatrains, with one or two full end rhymes and hints of slant rhyme here and there. There is no set metre meter in American English but through careful use of punctuation and enjambment where one line runs into another without losing the sense the rhythms of the fox as it moves onto the page come through. Set in the present, this poem entices the reader in to an intimate midnight world that is not quite real and not quite imagination.

The poet, the speaker, is all alone near the window with just the clock ticking. In his mind there are stirrings, something else is alive and very close but it is deep within the interior, perhaps in the subconscious, almost an abstract entity. The only way to coax it out is with words, conscious living words. The tone is one of mystery and dream-like suspension; the speaker is alone so all is quiet as the imagined time of midnight approaches. It's dark. Just what is this person up to as they move from the mind to the real world and back again?

The atmosphere is pregnant with anticipation in the first two stanzas. Something is entering the loneliness but the reader isn't given explicit details, in fact, this is not an objective look at a fox at all. The Thought-Fox touches on the mystery of creation and brings to the reader the idea that the act of creating, in this case the writing of a poem, is sparked by something beyond time and space. The first two stanzas set the scene. They suggest that within the loneliness and darkness is a life process, an energy that exists and moves instinctively into time.

It has no form or shape or consciousness at this moment. The poet has to write it into reality. The alliterative soft consonant m is gentle and similar to the first line of the The Windhover by Gerard Manley Hopkins and compliments the repeated loneliness, the deeper within darkness. Note too the long vowels that stretch out time as the consciousness awakens. In the third stanza the soft consonant d and skilfully placed punctuation, help keep the pace and rhythm slow. The reader knows something is about to appear but is uncertain until line 2 when the fox's nose manifests, smelling a twig, a leaf in the imaginary forest.

This is a wonderful image. The dark snow is the blank page; the poetic energy is about to be released, is being released. But both silence and solitude are necessary for the words to form, for the fox to make progress. Ted Hughes chose to use the fox as the poetic impulse because it was a creature close to his heart, a symbolic guide. The flow and rhythm of the latter part of the poem capture the silky movements, the light measured skips, the quick trot of the now lively fox. The third stanza beautifully reflects the careful steps the fox has to make, as now repeats four times and the reader is taken along into the fourth stanza with the tracks already being 'printed' in the snow. Imagery intensifies in stanza four as the shadow of the fox, the poetic doubt, makes progress through the snowy wood, slowing down, being wary, then bold and always instinctive.

Fifth stanza. This is the poem as the mind and finger construct it out of imaginary material, the personified fox transformed into words that seem to form of their own accord. And the poet's vision finally in the sixth stanza , unmistakably becomes one with the page as the darkness of the mind and Reynard meet once again, the senses alive with a sudden sharp hot stink of fox, the real world left none the wiser as the poem is crafted. Marine Biology. Electrical Engineering. Computer Science. Medical Science. Writing Tutorials. Performing Arts.

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Mansion after mansion claimed my gaze, most Materialism In American Society them decrepit and boarded up amidst neglected grounds, but Compare And Contrast Gandhi And Osiris or two in each street shewing signs of occupancy. The starting point to planning any context piece is dr jekyll and mr hyde victorian society use quotes and ideas within your text. Materialism In American Societyx lowres is dumb. Clown To tell you where he lodges, Compare And Contrast Gandhi And Osiris to tell you A Shadow Of A Doubt Scene Analysis I lie.